Tag Archives: Teen fiction

BOOK Revi: Thirteen Reasons Why – Jay Asher

ewThirteen Reasons WhyThirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I picked up this book after hearing everyone talk about the television show (which I still haven’t seen). The Wikipedia entry promised that this would be dark and it wasn’t lying. It’s nowhere close to Gone Girl but I’d say Gone Girl’s Amy may have been something like this book’s Hannah Baker when she was younger.

The things that happen to Hannah expose the brutal gendered violence and hostility meted out to women all over the world, even in privileged groups like white urban America. Slut-shaming, fuckboy manipulation, bullying, stalking, harassment, rape…all of these find graphic mention in the story. These are important issues that do not get addressed enough and worse, are invalidated by even the legal systems across nations.

The blurb already tells you about the dead girl’s suicide note via cassette tapes. There is a whiny, accusatory tone throughout, which I suppose stays true to this being a diary entry style confessional about a suicidal (now dead) teenager. There is a very specific point where Hannah’s narrative goes from shocked victim to mentally unstable. I’m not sure if that’s a good thing since it seems to indicate that depression could be caused by external events rather than being an illness of its own kind.

It’s not very clear why Clay is part of this story at all, given there’s absolutely no foreshadowing or indication that she even knows of his existence. Similarly, Tony is a bit too deus ex machina. All the characters other than Hannah and Clay appear one-dimensional. I’m not sure that this is a deliberate attempt to establish an unreliable narrator. It just seems like poor characterisation. Even given the first person narrative, it’s interspersed with enough of Clay’s point of view to balance out the other characters. The book does not do this.

I guess in sum, I’d say this book could have been better but considering there isn’t one mainstream one addressing these issues among teenagers in an easy-to-read way, this is as good as it gets. It’s quite readable.

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BOOK Review: Looking For Alaska – John Green

Looking for AlaskaLooking for Alaska by John Green

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

My first John Green was ‘The Fault in Our Stars‘ which I came to reluctantly, assuming it would be soppy and shoddily written. I was wrong. Falling in love with that book led me to rush out and buy ‘Paper Towns‘. And that was a HUGE letdown (with a great title). I also bought ‘Looking for Alaska‘ but after ‘Paper Towns‘, I put it away, my taste for John Green’s neurotic teenagers soured.

I picked it up again this week, meaning to clear my unread shelf and we’re back in love. Just like ‘Paper Towns‘, the heroine of this novel is self-absorbed, flaky, impulsive and just plain bad for you. But unlike in that one, she’s glorified a little less and the protagonists are a bit more self-aware of how destructive she is for them.

The ending (or should I call it the middle, since the book is roughly split into Before, During and After) is a shock in a good way because it makes you realise just how much you care about the characters. The lines are funny and then tragic but always poignant in that teenage way where everything is intense but also true. The plot transitions smoothly too even if it takes awhile to get started.

John Green’s writing is warm and intimate and makes you feel close to the situations and characters even if you don’t like them or relate to them much.

I don’t know what went wrong with ‘Paper Towns‘ but ‘Looking for Alaska‘ gets it right in all the ways that ‘The Fault in Our Stars‘ did. If you liked the latter, you’ll definitely like this one. I’d even go so far to say this is the better book, because it manages to touch you without all the cancer melodrama of TFIOS. Skip ‘Paper Towns‘, move right on to Alaska and the stars.

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Stirring Up Trouble: Juli Alexander – A Contemporary Sabrina, Teen Witch

Stirring Up TroubleStirring Up Trouble by Juli Alexander
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Zoe is a regular teenager in a lot of ways – second fiddle to a more glamorous best friend, crushing on this best friend’s hunky boyfriend, trying to cope with her parents’ matrimonial troubles. Regular in most ways except one. She’s also a teenage witch. The trouble is that she can’t use her powers for her own benefit, unless she wants to contend with horrible retribution that could take the form of anything from embarrassing appearance changes to unstoppable hiccups.

Otherwise a regular teen drama, this story adds generous doses of supernatural humour. All the characters are likeable and well-shaded, except perhaps Anya, the spoilt best friend who comes across as cardboard and caricatured.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and look forward the next one in the series – Trouble’s Brewing. I got this book from NetGalley

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Bad Houses: Sara Ryan – Failin Times

Bad HousesBad Houses by Sara Ryan
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A mournful story about several defeated folks in a town that’s aptly named ‘Failin’. Cat & Lewis run Matchless Estate Sales, a service that cleans out houses (for people who don’t want to do it themselves) by selling every item in the houses. There is already an undertone of melancholia to a job that essentially cremates old homes, taking care of the messy details that no one else wants to touch. Then there are the estate sales fanatics who will bid on the lottery draw of an unopened storage space and hide objects of value so they can come back on the half-price day to claim them. Anna Cole inhabits these sales, seeking scraps of leftover warmth, for reprieve from her own dysfunctional family. How these two families meet, bruise each others’ lives and finally resolve is the story of Bad Houses. I liked the artwork but the character’s faces got a little confusing, especially since there was a mini storyline from the past, embedded right in the middle. A decent story overall, if only nothing new.

I got this book from NetGalley.

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